INFORMATION | COMMUNICATION | COLLABORATION

% of Africans in Each Country (World)

 

A

Afghanistan: 0.018%
Albania: 3.155%
Algeria: 98%
American Samoa: 0.149%
Andorra: 0.012%
Angola: 98.649%
Anguilla: 90.08%
Antigua and Barbuda: 92%
Argentina: 0.124%
Armenia: 0.002%
Aruba: 24.038%
 Australia: 1.399%
 Austria: 0.12%
 Azerbaijan: 0.012%



 B
Bahamas: 85%
 Bahrain: 15%
 Bangladesh: 0.315%
 Barbados: 90%
 Belarus: 0.001%
 Belgium: 0.703%
 Belize: 31.25%
 Benin: 96.926%
 Bermuda: 61.538%
 Bhutan: 0.008%
 Bolivia: 1.155%
 Bosnia and Herzegovina: 0.003%
 Botswana: 95.643%
 Brazil: 45.26%
 British Virgin Islands: 86.957%
 Brunei: 0.1%
 Bulgaria: 0.001%
 Burkina Faso: 93.156%
 Burundi: 97.675%



C
 Cambodia: 0.007%
 Cameroon: 98.161%
 Canada: 2.995%
 Cape Verde: 68%
 Cayman Islands: 63.83%
 Central African Republic: 98.8%
 Chad: 88%
 Chile: 0.119%
 China: 0.008%
 Colombia: 21.308%
 Comoros: 90.909%
 Congo-Brazzaville: 92.887%
 Cook Islands: 0.99%
 Costa Rica: 3.133%
 Côte d'Ivoire: 85.94%
 Croatia: 0.002%
 Cuba: 62%
 Cyprus: 0.629%
 Czech Republic: 0.005%



D
 Democratic Republic of the Congo: 98.091%
 Denmark: 0.547%
 Djibouti: 96.478%
 Dominica: 93%
 Dominican Republic: 84%

 

  


E

 East Timor: 0.009%
 Ecuador: 3%
 Egypt: 99.6%
 El Salvador: 0.012%
 Equatorial Guinea: 97.81%
 Eritrea: 98.659%
 Estonia: 0.007%
 Ethiopia: 98.261%

 

 


F

 Falkland Islands: 0.333%
 Faroe Islands: 0.205%
 Fiji: 1.208%
 Finland: 0.019%
 France: 9.306%
 French Guiana: 66%
 French Polynesia: 0.385%

 

 


G

 Gabon: 81.3%
 Gambia: 83.71%
 Georgia: 0.023%
 Germany: 0.73%
 Ghana: 91.452%
 Gibraltar: 5%
 Greece: 0.27%
 Greenland: 0.017%
 Grenada: 95%
 Guadeloupe: 92%
 Guam: 0.006%
 Guatemala: 2%
 Guernsey: 0.152%
 Guinea: 94.682%
 Guinea-Bissau: 99.5%
 Guyana: 36%

 

 


H

 Haiti: 97.5%
 Honduras: 2%
 Hong Kong: 0.036%
 Hungary: 0.01%

 

 


I

 Iceland: 0.031%
 India: 2.5%
 Indonesia: 0.002%
 Iran: 0.001%
 Iraq: 0.034%
 Ireland: 0.226%
 Isle of Man: 0.125%
 Israel: 25.2%
 Italy: 1.3%

 

 


J

 Jamaica: 97.4%
 Japan: 0.004%
 Jersey: 0.112%
 Jordan: 0.017%

 

 


K

 Kazakhstan: 0.001%
 Kenya: 97.993%
 Kiribati: 1.053%
 Kuwait: 2%
 Kyrgyzstan: 0.002%

 

 


L

 Laos: 0.017%
 Latvia: 0.004%
 Lebanon: 0.098%
 Lesotho: 98.666%
 Liberia: 97.477%
 Libya: 97%
 Liechtenstein: 2.828%
 Lithuania: 0.003%
 Luxembourg: 0.207%

 

 


M

 Macau: 0.186%
 Macedonia: 0.049%
 Madagascar: 98.661%
 Malawi: 96.835%
 Malaysia: 5%
 Maldives: 3%
 Mali: 98.66%
 Malta: 0.024%
 Marshall Islands: 0.017%
 Martinique: 72%
 Mauritania: 96.849%
 Mauritius: 97%
 Mayotte: 91%
 Mexico: 1.09%
 Micronesia: 0.901%
 Moldova: 0.003%
 Monaco: 0.303%
 Mongolia: 0.004%
 Montenegro: 0.017%
 Montserrat: 65%
 Morocco: 99%
 Mozambique: 96.949%
 Myanmar: 0.01%

 

 


N

 Namibia: 91.959%
 Nauru: 1%
 Nepal: 0%
 Netherlands: 1.823%
 Netherlands Antilles: 85%
 New Caledonia: 0.041%
 New Zealand: 0.023%
 Nicaragua: 9%
 Niger: 98.112%
 Nigeria: 98.262%
 Niue: 0.063%
 North Korea: 0%
 Northern Mariana Islands: 0.119%
 Norway: 0.021%

 

 


O

 Oman: 8%

 

 


P

 Pakistan: 4.5%
 Palau: 0.5%
 Palestine: 2.33%
 Panama: 14%
 Papua New Guinea: 94.772%
 Paraguay: 0.1%
 Peru: 3%
 Philippines: 0.01%
 Pitcairn Islands: 2%
 Poland: 0.02%
 Portugal: 2%
 Puerto Rico: 8%




Q

Qatar: 0.9%

 

 


R

 Réunion: 68%
 Romania: 0.005%
 Russia: 0.014%
 Rwanda: 97.661%

 

 


S

 Saint Helena: 50%
 Saint Kitts and Nevis: 98%
 Saint Lucia: 82.5%
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: 85%
 Saint-Barthélemy: 27.4%
 Saint-Martin: 53.5%
 Saint-Pierre and Miquelon: 0.163%
 Samoa: 0.53%
 San Marino: 0.032%
 São Tomé and Príncipe: 93.8%
 Saudi Arabia: 10%
 Senegal: 96.204%
 Serbia: 0.001%
 Seychelles: 94%
 Sierra Leone: 96.846%
 Singapore: 0.022%
 Slovakia: 0.002%
 Slovenia: 0.005%
 Solomon Islands: 0.02%
 Somalia: 95.573%
 Somaliland: 99%
 South Africa: 98.6%
 South Korea: 0.002%
 Spain: 1.3%
 Sri Lanka: 1.8%
 Sudan: 97.273%
 Suriname: 47%
 Swaziland: 97%
 Sweden: 0.217%
 Switzerland: 0.327%
 Syria: 0.1%

 

 


T

 Taiwan: 0.004%
 Tajikistan: 0.001%
 Tanzania: 96.934%
 Thailand: 0.002%
 Togo: 96.022%
 Tokelau: 2.857%
 Tonga: 10%
 Trinidad and Tobago: 58%
 Tunisia: 99.6%
 Turkey: 4.25%
 Turkmenistan: 0.002%
 Turks and Caicos Islands: 34%
 Tuvalu: 0.091%

 

 


U

 U.S. Virgin Islands: 78%
 Uganda: 97.124%
 Ukraine: 0%
 United Arab Emirates: 8.8%
 United Kingdom: 3%
 United States of America: 12.9%
 Uruguay: 4%
 Uzbekistan: 0%

 

 


V

 Vanuatu: 0.044%
 Vatican City: 12.5%
 Venezuela: 18.25%
 Vietnam: 0.1%

 

 


W

 Wallis and Futuna: 0.667%
 Western Sahara: 99%

 

 


X

 

 


Y

 Yemen: 35%

 

 


Z

 Zambia: 96.643%
 Zimbabwe: 95.072%

 

 


AFRICANS IN

THE WORLD

 
Global: 34.227%

 

 


Related article
s:
What is African?
The Issue of Race

 

 

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American Samoan Values and World Cultural Exchange

COUNTRY OR TERRITORY: American Samoa
HISTORICAL HEGEMONIST: United States of America
DATE OF INDEPENDENCE:
LANGUAGE: Samoan, US English
COUNTRY POPULATION: 67000
POPULATION OF AFRICAN DESCENTS:

 

NTRODUCTION

American Samoa/ Amerika Sāmoa; also Amelika Sāmoa or Sāmoa Amelika) is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of the sovereign state of Samoa (formerly known as Western Samoa). The main (largest and most populous) island is Tutuila, with the Manuʻa Islands, Rose Atoll, and Swains Island also included in the territory.

 

American Samoa is part of the Samoan Islands chain, located west of the Cook Islands, north of Tonga, and some 300 miles (500 km) south of Tokelau. To the west are the islands of the Wallis and Futuna group. The 2000 census showed a total population of 57,291 people.The total land area is 76.1 square miles (197.1 km2), slightly more than Washington, D.C. American Samoa is the southernmost territory of the United States.

 


RACIAL IDENTITY

 

The population of American Samoa stands at about 65,000 people, 95% of whom live on the largest island, Tutuila.

Of the population, 91.6 percent are nativeSamoans, 2.8% are Asian, 1.1% are Caucasian, 4.2% are Mixed, and 0.3% are of other origin. Samoan, a language closely related to Hawaiian and other Polynesian languages, is spoken by 90.6 percent of the people, while 2.9% speak English, 2.4% speak Tongan, 2.1% speak other languages, and 2% speak other Pacific islander languages, with most people being bilingual. American Samoa is largelyChristian (50% Christian Congregationalist, 20% Roman Catholic, 30% Protestant and other

 

ETHNICITY

The ethnic culture of American Samoa is almost the same as the ethnic culture of Western Samoa (Upolu). The U.S. sovereignty distinguishes the civilization of American Samoa from the sovereign Samoa.

While the two Samoas share language and ethnicity, their cultures have recently followed different paths, with American Samoans often emigrating toHawaiʻi and the U.S. mainland, and adopting many U.S. customs, such as the playing of American football and baseball. Western Samoans have tended to emigrate instead to New Zealand, whose influence has made the sports of rugby and cricket more popular in the western islands. Travel writerPaul Theroux noted that there were marked differences between the societies in Samoa and American Samoa.

ATMOSPHERE

Due to economic hardship, military service has been seen as an opportunity in American Samoa and other U.S. Overseas territories,[12] this has meant that based on population there have been a disproportionate number of casualties per population compared to other parts of the United States. As of 23 March 2009 there have been 10 American Samoans who have died inIraq, and 2 who have died in Afghanistan.

 

 

People born in American Samoa — including those born on Swains Island — are American nationals, but are not American citizens unless one of their parents is a U.S. citizen. As U.S. nationals, American Samoans may not vote in U.S. presidential elections.However, American Samoans are entitled to free and unrestricted entry into the United States.

Samoans are entitled to elect one non-voting delegate to the United States House of Representatives.Their delegate since 1989 has been DemocratEni Fa'aua'a Hunkin Faleomavaega, Jr. They also send delegates to theDemocratic and Republican National Conventions.

 

 

Employment on the island falls into three relatively equal-sized categories of approximately 5,000 workers each: the public sector, the single remainingtuna cannery, and the rest of the private sector.

There are only a few federal employees in American Samoa and no active duty military personnel except members of the U.S. Coast Guard, although there is an Army Reserve unit. There is also a U.S. Army recruiting station in Utulai.

The overwhelming majority of public sector employees work for the American Samoa territorial government. The one tuna cannery, StarKist, exports several hundred million dollars worth of canned tuna to the United States each year. The other tuna cannery, Samoa Packing, a Chicken of the Sea subsidiary, closed in 2009 due to American Samoans being granted minimum wage.[29] In early 2007 the Samoan economy was highlighted in the Congress as it was not mentioned in the minimum wage bill, at the request of the Samoan delegate to the United States House of Representatives, Eni Faleomavaega.[clarification needed]

From 2002 to 2007, real GDP of American Samoa increased at an average annual rate of 0.4 percent. The annual growth rates of real GDP ranged from -2.9 percent to +2.1 percent. The volatility in the growth rates of real GDP was primarily accounted for by changes in the exports of canned tuna. The tuna canning industry was the largest private employer in American Samoa during this period.

 

 

 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

 

18th century – first Western contact

Samoa Islands Map 1896.

Contact with Europeans began in the early 18th century. Jacob Roggeveen (1659–1729), a Dutchman, was the first known European to sight the Samoan islands in 1722. This visit was followed by the French explorerLouis-Antoine de Bougainville(1729–1811), who named them the Navigator Islands in 1768. Contact was limited before the 1830s which is when Englishmissionaries and traders began arriving.

Early Western contact included a battle in the eighteenth century between French explorers and islanders in Tutuila, for which the Samoans were blamed in the West, giving them a reputation for ferocity. The site of this battle is called Massacre Bay.


19th century

Mission work in the Samoas had begun in late 1830 by John Williams, of theLondon Missionary Society arrived from The Cook Islands and Tahiti.[3] By that time, the Samoans had gained a reputation of being savage and warlike, as violent altercations had occurred between natives and French, British, German, and American forces, who, by the late nineteenth century, valuedPago Pago Harbor as a refueling station for coal-fired shipping and whaling.


20th century

German, British and American warships in Apia harbour, Samoa 1899.

In March 1889, a German naval force invaded a village in Samoa, and by doing so destroyed some American property. Three American warships then entered the Apia harbor and prepared to engage three German warships found there. Before guns were fired, a typhoon wrecked both the American and German ships. A compulsory armistice was called because of the lack of warships.

 

At the turn of the twentieth century, international rivalries in the latter half of the century were settled by the 1899 Tripartite Convention in which Germany and the United States partitioned the Samoan Islands into two parts:[5] the eastern island group became a territory of the United States (the Tutuila Islands in 1900 and officially Manu'a in 1904) and is today known as American Samoa; the western islands, by far the greater landmass, became known as German Samoa after Britain vacated all claims to Samoa and accepted termination of German rights in Tonga and certain areas in the Solomon Islands and West Africa.[6] Forerunners to the Tripartite Convention of 1899 were the Washington Conference of 1887, the Treaty of Berlin of 1889 and the Anglo-German Agreement on Samoa of 1899.

[edit]A U.S. territory is b

18th century – first Western contact

Samoa Islands Map 1896.

Contact with Europeans began in the early 18th century. Jacob Roggeveen (1659–1729), a Dutchman, was the first known European to sight the Samoan islands in 1722. This visit was followed by the French explorerLouis-Antoine de Bougainville(1729–1811), who named them the Navigator Islands in 1768. Contact was limited before the 1830s which is when Englishmissionaries and traders began arriving.

Early Western contact included a battle in the eighteenth century between French explorers and islanders in Tutuila, for which the Samoans were blamed in the West, giving them a reputation for ferocity. The site of this battle is called Massacre Bay.

[edit]19th century

Mission work in the Samoas had begun in late 1830 by John Williams, of theLondon Missionary Society arrived from The Cook Islands and Tahiti.[3] By that time, the Samoans had gained a reputation of being savage and warlike, as violent altercations had occurred between natives and French, British, German, and American forces, who, by the late nineteenth century, valuedPago Pago Harbor as a refueling station for coal-fired shipping and whaling.

[edit]20th century

German, British and American warships in Apia harbour, Samoa 1899.

In March 1889, a German naval force invaded a village in Samoa, and by doing so destroyed some American property. Three American warships then entered the Apia harbor and prepared to engage three German warships found there.[4] Before guns were fired, a typhoon wrecked both the American and German ships. A compulsory armistice was called because of the lack of warships.[4]

At the turn of the twentieth century, international rivalries in the latter half of the century were settled by the 1899 Tripartite Convention in which Germany and the United States partitioned the Samoan Islands into two parts:[5] the eastern island group became a territory of the United States (the Tutuila Islands in 1900 and officially Manu'a in 1904) and is today known as American Samoa; the western islands, by far the greater landmass, became known as German Samoa after Britain vacated all claims to Samoa and accepted termination of German rights in Tonga and certain areas in the Solomon Islands and West Africa.[6] Forerunners to the Tripartite Convention of 1899 were the Washington Conference of 1887, the Treaty of Berlin of 1889 and the Anglo-German Agreement on Samoa of 1899.

]A U.S. territory is born

Pago Pago harbor today and inter-island dock area.

The following year, the U.S. formally occupied its portion: a smaller group of eastern islands, one of which surrounds the noted harbor of Pago Pago. After theUnited States Navy took possession of eastern Samoa on behalf of the United States, the existing coaling station at Pago Pago Bay was expanded into a full naval station, known as United States Naval Station Tutuila under the command of a commandant. The Navy secured a Deed of Cession of Tutuila in 1900 and a Deed of Cession of Manuʻa in 1904. The last sovereign of Manuʻa, the Tui Manuʻa Elisala, was forced to sign a Deed of Cession ofManuʻa following a series of U.S. Naval trials, known as the "Trial of the Ipu", in Pago Pago, Taʻu, and aboard a Pacific Squadron gunboat.[7] The territory became known as the U.S. Naval Station Tutuila.

On July 17, 1911, the U.S. Naval Station Tutuila, which was composed of Tutuila, Aunu'u and Manu'a, was officially renamed American Samoa.


The early century and WW I

After World War I, during the time of the Mau movement in Western Samoa(then a League of Nations mandate governed by New Zealand), there was a corresponding American Samoa Mau movement, led by Lauaki Namulauulu Mamoe, a World War I veteran who was from Leone village. After meetings in the United States mainland, he was prevented from disembarking from the ship that brought him home to American Samoa and was not allowed to return because the American Samoa Mau movement was suppressed by the U.S. Navy. In 1930 the U.S. Congress sent a committee to investigate the status of American Samoa, led by Americans who had had a part in the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii.


The Pacific War (WW II)

During World War II, U.S. Marines in Samoa outnumbered the local population, having a huge cultural influence. Young Samoan men from the age of 14 and above were combat trained by U.S. military personnel. Samoans served in various capacities during World War II, including as combatants, medical personnel, code personnel, and ship repairmen.

After World War II, Organic Act 4500, a U.S. Department of Interior-sponsored attempt to incorporate American Samoa, was defeated in Congress, primarily through the efforts of Samoan chiefs, led by Tuiasosopo Mariota. These chiefs' efforts led to the creation of a local legislature, theAmerican Samoa Fono which meets in the village of Fagatogo, often considered the territory's de facto and de jure capital (the United States regards Pago Pago as the official capital of the territory).


The latter century: 1951 to 1999

In time, the Navy-appointed governor was replaced by a locally elected one. Although technically considered "unorganized" since the U.S. Congress has not passed an Organic Act for the territory, American Samoa is self-governing under a constitution that became effective on July 1, 1967. The U.S. Territory of American Samoa is on the United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories, a listing which is disputed by the territorial government officials, who do consider themselves to be self-governing.

In July 1997, the Western Samoa's constitution was amended to change the name of the country to Samoa.The U.S. territory of American Samoa protested the move, asserting that the change diminished its own identity. American Samoans still use the terms Western Samoa and Western Samoans to describe the independent State of Samoa and its inhabitants.

 

While the two Samoas share language and ethnicity, their cultures have recently followed different paths, with American Samoans often emigrating toHawaiʻi and the U.S. mainland, and adopting many U.S. customs, such as the playing of American football and baseball. Western Samoans have tended to emigrate instead to New Zealand, whose influence has made the sports of rugby and cricket more popular in the western islands. Travel writerPaul Theroux noted that there were marked differences between the societies in Samoa and American Samoa.


[edit]World Stage Events

[edit]Pan American and first Trans South Pacific flight

the Samoan Clipper.

In 1938, the noted aviator Ed Musick and his crew died on thePan American World Airways S-42 Samoan Clipper over Pago Pago, while on a survey flight toAuckland, New Zealand. Sometime after take-off, the aircraft experienced trouble, and Musick turned it back toward Pago Pago. While the crew began dumping fuel in preparation for an emergency landing, a spark in the fuel pump caused an explosion that tore the aircraft apart in mid-air.


Apollo Space Program and American Samoa contribution

Locations of Pacific Ocean splashdowns of American spacecraft.

American Samoa and Pago Pago International Airport had historic significance with the U.S. Apollo Program. The astronaut crews of Apollo 10, 12, 13, 14, and 17were retrieved a few hundred miles from Pago Pago and transported by helicopter to the airport prior to being flown to Honolulu on C-141 Starliftermilitary aircraft.


September 2009 earthquake and tsunami

Tonga Trench south of the Samoa Islands and north ofNew Zealand.

On September 29, 2009 at 17:48:11 UTC, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake struck 120 miles (190 km) off the coast of American Samoa, followed by smaller aftershocks.[17] It was thelargest earthquake of 2009. The quake occurred on the outer rise of the Kermadec-Tonga Subduction Zone. This is part of thePacific Ring of Fire, where tectonic plates in the Earth's lithosphere meet and earthquakes and volcanic activity are common. The quake struck 11.2 miles (18.0 km) below the ocean floor and generated an onsetting tsunami that killed more than 170 people in the Samoa Islands and Tonga. Four waves with heights from 15 feet (4.6 m) to 20 feet (6.1 m) high were reported to have reached up to one mile (1.6 km) inland on the island of Tutuila.

The Defense Logistics Agency (DSCP) worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide 16’ x 16’ humanitarian tents to the devastated areas of American Samoa.



The Pacific War (WW II)

During World War II, U.S. Marines in Samoa outnumbered the local population, having a huge cultural influence. Young Samoan men from the age of 14 and above were combat trained by U.S. military personnel. Samoans served in various capacities during World War II, including as combatants, medical personnel, code personnel, and ship repairmen.

After World War II, Organic Act 4500, a U.S. Department of Interior-sponsored attempt to incorporate American Samoa, was defeated in Congress, primarily through the efforts of Samoan chiefs, led by Tuiasosopo Mariota.[10] These chiefs' efforts led to the creation of a local legislature, theAmerican Samoa Fono which meets in the village of Fagatogo, often considered the territory's de facto and de jure capital (the United States regards Pago Pago as the official capital of the territory).


The latter century: 1951 to 1999

In time, the Navy-appointed governor was replaced by a locally elected one. Although technically considered "unorganized" since the U.S. Congress has not passed an Organic Act for the territory, American Samoa is self-governing under a constitution that became effective on July 1, 1967. The U.S. Territory of American Samoa is on the United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories, a listing which is disputed by the territorial government officials, who do consider themselves to be self-governing.

 

In July 1997, the Western Samoa's constitution was amended to change the name of the country to Samoa. The U.S. territory of American Samoa protested the move, asserting that the change diminished its own identity. American Samoans still use the terms Western Samoa and Western Samoans to describe the independent State of Samoa and its inhabitants.

 

While the two Samoas share language and ethnicity, their cultures have recently followed different paths, with American Samoans often emigrating toHawaiʻi and the U.S. mainland, and adopting many U.S. customs, such as the playing of American football and baseball. Western Samoans have tended to emigrate instead to New Zealand, whose influence has made the sports of rugby and cricket more popular in the western islands. Travel writerPaul Theroux noted that there were marked differences between the societies in Samoa and American Samoa.



 

CULTURAL RELATIONS WITH AFRICANS

 

The American Samoan national Rugby League team represents the country in international Rugby League. The team has competed in the 1988, 1992, 1998 & 2004 pacific cup competition. The team has also competed in the 2003 and 2004 world sevens qualifiers in the 2005 World sevens. America Samoa's first match in international Rugby League was in 1988 pacific cup against Tonga, Tonga won the match 38-14 which is still the biggest lost by a American Samoan side. American Samoa's biggest win was in 2004 against New Caledonia with the score ending at 62-6.

American Samoa get broadcast of the National Rugby League in Australia on free-to-air television.[47]

There is also a new movement which aims to set up a four team domestic competition in American Samoa.[48]

Professional wrestling

A number of American Samoan athletes have been very visible in boxing, kickboxing, wrestling (see especially Anoa'i family). World Wrestling Entertainment has employed many members from the Anoa'i family, most famously Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. Also in professional wrestling, a wrestler called Samoa Joe competes in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling.

Sumo wrestling

Some Samoan Sumo wrestlers, most famously Musashimaru and Konishiki have reached the highest rank of Ozeki and yokozuna. Despite the relatively small population of the islands many Samoans and people of Samoan descent have reached high ranks in many professional sports leagues.

Soccer

American Samoa's national soccer team is one of the newest teams in the world, and is also noted for being the world's weakest. They lost to Australia 31–0 in a FIFA World Cup qualifying match on April 11, 2001, but on 22 November 2011 they finally won their first ever game, beating Tonga 2-1 in a FIFA World Cup qualifier.[49] The appearance of American Samoa's Jonny Saelua in the contest "apparently became the first transgender player to compete on a World Cup stage."[50]

Track and field

Track and field is not a popular sport in American Samoa, but it hit the limelight when they sent a 130kg sprinter, (Sogelau Tuvalu) to compete in the men's 100m of the IAAF World Championships at Daegu, South Korea, in August 2011. The 17-year-old finished last in his preliminary rounds but clocked a personal best 15.66 seconds despite running into a headwind of -0.9, surprisingly not the slowest time in the world championships history as the time is faster than 21.73 seconds set in 1997 by an injured Kim Collins who became the world champion six years later.[51]. Tuvalu was actually a shot putter but did not qualify for the shotput event so instead competed in the 100m. He was said to have trained for 4 months for the 100m, though did not wear spikes, and instead wore shot putters smooth bottom shoes.

 

SOCIAL ISSUES

 

 

The American Samoan national Rugby League team represents the country in international Rugby League. The team has competed in the 1988, 1992, 1998 & 2004 pacific cup competition. The team has also competed in the 2003 and 2004 world sevens qualifiers in the 2005 World sevens. America Samoa's first match in international Rugby League was in 1988 pacific cup against Tonga, Tonga won the match 38-14 which is still the biggest lost by a American Samoan side. American Samoa's biggest win was in 2004 against New Caledonia with the score ending at 62-6.

American Samoa get broadcast of the National Rugby League in Australia on free-to-air television.[47]

There is also a new movement which aims to set up a four team domestic competition in American Samoa.[48]

Professional wrestling

A number of American Samoan athletes have been very visible in boxing, kickboxing, wrestling (see especially Anoa'i family). World Wrestling Entertainment has employed many members from the Anoa'i family, most famously Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. Also in professional wrestling, a wrestler called Samoa Joe competes in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling.

Sumo wrestling

Some Samoan Sumo wrestlers, most famously Musashimaru and Konishiki have reached the highest rank of Ozeki and yokozuna. Despite the relatively small population of the islands many Samoans and people of Samoan descent have reached high ranks in many professional sports leagues.

Soccer

American Samoa's national soccer team is one of the newest teams in the world, and is also noted for being the world's weakest. They lost to Australia 31–0 in a FIFA World Cup qualifying match on April 11, 2001, but on 22 November 2011 they finally won their first ever game, beating Tonga 2-1 in a FIFA World Cup qualifier.[49] The appearance of American Samoa's Jonny Saelua in the contest "apparently became the first transgender player to compete on a World Cup stage."[50]

Track and field

Track and field is not a popular sport in American Samoa, but it hit the limelight when they sent a 130kg sprinter, (Sogelau Tuvalu) to compete in the men's 100m of the IAAF World Championships at Daegu, South Korea, in August 2011. The 17-year-old finished last in his preliminary rounds but clocked a personal best 15.66 seconds despite running into a headwind of -0.9, surprisingly not the slowest time in the world championships history as the time is faster than 21.73 seconds set in 1997 by an injured Kim Collins who became the world champion six years later.[51]. Tuvalu was actually a shot putter but did not qualify for the shotput event so instead competed in the 100m. He was said to have trained for 4 months for the 100m, though did not wear spikes, and instead wore shot putters smooth bottom shoes.

 

 

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